Publications

The ICFR produces several scientific publications which include internal reports (Bulletins and Technical Notes) as well as Peer-reviewed Papers. We also produce various handbooks, technology transfer documents such as our field guides, and general information publications such as our Annual Research Reviews. Most internal reports are proprietary, limited to funding members.

Use of Regression Trees to link Uromycladium acaciae symptoms to Acacia Mearnsii growth variates

Authors
Payn R.G. and Little K.M.
Publication Type
Technical Note
Publication Year
2018

From 2012/13 Uromycladium acaciae (wattle rust) has spread throughout the Acacia mearnsii (black wattle) growing areas of South Africa. The newly emerged disease affects trees of all age classes and causes growth reductions and mortalities with severe infestations. Fungicides have been tested and found to be effective for managing the disease, with the timing of application necessary for optimal control.

Economics of fungicide application schedules for the control of wattle rust (Uromycladium acaciae) in Acacia mearnsii plantations, South Africa

Authors
Payn R.G, Nxumalo, T. and Little K.M.
Publication Type
Technical Note
Publication Year
2018

Acacia mearnsii (black wattle) plantations in South Africa cover approximately 110 000 ha. Uromycladium acacia (wattle rust) has spread over Limpopo to the Western Cape of South Africa. This disease of black wattle causes reductions in growth and mortalities in severe infections. In October 2014 six trials were initiated in Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal to determine the effectiveness of fungicides, varied application schedules, and adjuvants for the management of wattle rust.

Fertilisation and vegetation management impacts on longer-term Pinus greggii productivity

Authors
Ndlovu N.N, Little K.M. and Titshall L.
Publication Type
Bulletin
Publication Year
2018

Robust management decision-making requires constant improvements to the understanding of the short- and longer-term impacts of re-establishment practices on tree performance. There is a lack of information regarding the impact of fertilisation and vegetation management on the longer-term (mature stand or rotation-end) yield of pines grown for pulpwood in South Africa.

Testing alternative synthetic and natural insecticides for the management of foliar insect pests on two Eucalyptus species in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands

Authors
Dlamini LS, Little KM and Sivparsad BJ
Publication Type
Bulletin
Publication Year
2018

Two trials were implemented in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands in October 2016 (at Ingwe and Balgowan plantations), to test the efficacy of eight different insecticides (synthetic and organic) for the management of foliar insect pests. The Ingwe trial was planted with Eucalyptus dunnii and the Balgowan trial was planted with Eucalyptus badjensis.

Pot trial 2: refined screening of alternative chemical and biological products against larvae of Schizonycha affinis (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) on wattle and eucalypt seedlings

Authors
Sivparsad BJ, Germishuizen I
Publication Type
Technical Note
Publication Year
2018

White grubs can contribute to serious transplant mortality immediately following re-establishment. Registered insecticide treatments of deltamethrin and imidacloprid have been deemed highly hazardous and their use is restricted by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). Therefore, there is an immediate need to find effective alternative products for the control of white grubs. A previous pot trial was conducted to screen a broad range of alternative chemical and biological products for the control of white grubs.

The effect of compaction and residue management on early 𝘌𝘢𝘀𝘒𝘭𝘺𝘱𝘡𝘢𝘴 π˜₯𝘢𝘯𝘯π˜ͺπ˜ͺ growth on a sandstone-derived soil near Highflats, KwaZulu-Natal

Authors
Kaptein N, Titshall L
Publication Type
Technical Note
Publication Year
2018

Soil compaction poses a threat to the productivity of South African commercial eucalypt plantations. The impact of compaction on dolerite- and aeolian- derived soils is well understood; however, there is no available information for sandstone-derived soils. In addition, the impact of leaving harvest residues or ripping these soils to reduce the degree of compaction is not fully understood.

The effect of regeneration method (coppice vs replant) on the susceptibility of a Eucalpytus grandis x E. camaldulensis clone to Leptocybe invasa

Authors
Benice J. Sivparsad, Ilaria Germishuizen, Keith Little and Ryan Nadel
Publication Type
Technical Note
Publication Year
2018

Leptocybe invasa Fisher & La Salle is an important pest of Eucalyptus plantations in South Africa (SA) as it causes significant reduction in growth or mortality. A trial was implemented in 2012 in Zululand (KwaZulu-Natal) to determine the effect of regeneration method (coppice vs replant) on the susceptibility of a Eucalyptus grandis x E. camaldulensis clone (GC clone) to L. invasa. The trial consisted of three treatments that were replicated four times and laid out in a randomised complete block design.

Pot trial screening of alternative chemical and biological products against larvae of Schizonycha affinis (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) on wattle and eucalypt seedlings

Authors
Sivparsad BJ, Morris A
Publication Type
Technical Note
Publication Year
2017

White grubs (Scarabaeidae larvae) can contribute to serious transplant mortality immediately following re-establishment. Synthetic insecticidal treatments of deltamethrin and imidacloprid are currently used in the control of white grub and other soil-borne insects of commercial forest tree species. However, the use of these insecticides has been deemed highly hazardous and is regulated by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). Therefore, there is an immediate need to find effective alternative products for the control of white grubs.

Management induced nutrient losses have minimal impact on a sensitive Zululand soil

Authors
Dovey SB. Titshall L
Publication Type
Technical Note
Publication Year
2017

Sustainable timber supply from a limited land resource necessitates management practices that aim to maintain an optimal soil nutrient supply to growing trees. Research to understand management impacts on soil productivity isΒ  required to inform site-specific risk and management decisions.Β  The effects of post-harvesting soil management operations were assessed on growth and soil properties on a low carbon, dystrophic sandy soil in the subtropical environment of the Zululand coastal ecosystem.